!
If you choose to report something anonymously, we will not be able to contact you directly and offer you any advice or support. It's important to us that we provide you with the support you need so if you would prefer to be contacted by an adviser, please complete a report with contact details.
If you have experienced hate, there is no right or wrong way to feel or be. What has happened is not your fault and you're not alone. Your safety and wellbeing are the most important things right now and you can access specialist support, if and whenever you feel ready.

 University Support

  •  Speak to advisor.  A specialist advisor will get in touch to discuss your options with you and will be able to offer appropriate practical and emotional support tailored to your circumstances.  This is confidential and does not instigate any kind of formal reporting process. 
  • Counselling Service. The Counselling Service offers confidential support to students and staff. 

External Support 

  • Stop Hate UK provides independent, confidential and accessible reporting and support for victims, witnesses and third parties.
  • Citizens Advice provides some useful information on the different types of harassment and hate crime people may experience including disability hate crime, racist and religious hate crime, and sexual orientation and transgender identity hate crime.
  • True Vision offers guidance on reporting hate crime and hate incidents. If you do not wish to talk to anyone in person about the incident or wish to remain anonymous, there is an online form for reporting hate crime; you can report non-crime hate incidents to the police to try and prevent any escalation in seriousness.
  • Greater Manchester Victims’ Services website provides useful information and practical advice for victims and survivors of crime, and their families. You can use it to find help, regardless of when the crime happened, or whether or not you reported it to the police.
  • Manchester LGBT Foundation has a number of groups covering a wide section of the LGBT community which meet at the Community Resource Centre on Richmond Street in Manchester. 
  • Galop is an LGBT+ anti-violence charity who support people who have experienced hate crime, sexual violence or domestic abuse.  They also support lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer people who have had problems with the police or have questions about the criminal justice system.
  • Disability Equality NW runs the Developing from the Negatives Project (DFN) which aims to raise awareness of Disability Hate Crime and encourage reporting. 
  • Tell MAMA supports victims of anti-Muslim hate and is a public service which also measures and monitors anti-Muslim incidents.
  • Community Security Trust (CS) helps those who are victims of anti-Semitic hatred, harassment or bias.

Reporting Options

It’s your choice. It's completely up to you whether or not to report what's happened. No-one else can or should make that choice for you. 

  • Police. In an emergency or if you are in immediate danger you should dial 999.  Otherwise, you can call 101 or visit your local police station to report a crime.  Reporting is a big decision and all of the support services linked to above can support you with this, if you decide to make a police report. 
  • University. If the perpetrator is a member of the University community you will have the option of submitting a formal report. The first step to making a formal report is to speak with an advisor,  who will be able to provide you with advice and support on what options are available to make an informed decision. 









 



Back

There are two ways you can tell us what happened